Category Archives: Features

Migraines: What, Why, and How to Fix Them

By Sharon Washio

Migraines are most commonly defined by their excruciating, pulsating pain. It is a prevalent disorder, with over 38 million Americans affected, of which approximately 28 million are women. It isn’t just your ordinary headache—some say that it feels like the side of their head is desperately trying to tear itself apart, inside out.

Take this quote from Anna Maria, featured on the Migraine Stories section of the Migraine Research Foundation site, for perspective. “As a child, I used to imagine putting an electric drill to my temple to open a hole that would release the pressure.” Migraines should always be treated tenderly without the stigma and judgement that sometimes unwelcomingly tags along perception of mental illnesses.

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11 Tips for Living a Happier and Healthier Life

By Natalia Brokate

  1. Take Time for Yourself

Eat a meal alone. Read a book. Fly a kite. Seriously, anything works. Just do it. I guarantee that you will feel refreshed after spending time alone with your thoughts. According to Dr. Reed Larson from the University of Illinois, alone time plays a constructive role in daily life and serves as a complement to social activities. Even if it feels awkward at first, spending time with your own thoughts will give you clarity and tranquility.

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December 3rd: International Day of Persons with Disabilities

By Barbara Gruszka

Since 1992, the United Nations has dedicated December 3rd as the International Day of Persons with Disabilities. Each year, the UN establishes a theme for the day, which centers conversations on a specific problem or initiative involving the disabled. This year, the theme is “Achieving 17 Goals for the Future We Want,” an initiative to make the world a more accessible and inclusive place for people who are mentally or physically disadvantaged.

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Meningitis Forum–Get Your Questions Answered

Want your questions about meningitis answered? After reviewing the literature, consulting information from the CDC, and/or speaking with experts, an editor from PPHR will respond to posts on this page within 48 hours. We encourage all questions as well as a productive discussion about the situation on campus.

Check it out here: https://pphr.princeton.edu/forums/forum/open-anonymous-forum-for-meningitis-outbreak-princeton-university/

DISCLAIMER: The Princeton Public Health Review is not affiliated with the CDC and is a publication operated by undergraduates. While editors’ responses will be based on thorough research, please bear in mind that our views might not necessarily coincide with those of the University or the CDC.

Exclusive Q&A with CDC’s Head of Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Disease Branch Dr. Thomas Clark

Recently, a student at Drexel passed away from meningitis caused by the serogroup B bacteria which caused an outbreak here at Princeton. The student had been in close contact with Princeton students a week before becoming ill. Further studies revealed that the bacterial strain in the Drexel student was the same as the outbreak strain at Princeton, according to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Find out about the concerns regarding the transmission of the bacteria and further steps to be taken directly from Dr. Thomas Clark, head of the meningitis vaccine initiative at CDC.

PPHR: Are there any concerns about spreading the disease even after students are vaccinated (both doses)?

Dr. Clark: Yes. When it comes down to it, we study vaccines and learn if they work or not, and whether they are effective at protecting against disease in people. Continue reading Exclusive Q&A with CDC’s Head of Meningitis and Vaccine Preventable Disease Branch Dr. Thomas Clark

Q&A with President Emeritus Harold Shapiro: Public health and policy–what does it involve?

The full scope of Public Health’s responsibilities is something which is continuously being debated.  Many things come to mind when we think of public health. Compulsory vaccines, combatting epidemics and outbreaks all come to mind. But who makes these decisions? And how are the ethical concerns evaluated and dealt with by the state and federal governments? Additionally, how is public opinion taken into consideration when evaluating the ethics behind key scientific discoveries? Below is a Q&A with Professor Harold Shapiro who is former President of Princeton and professor in the departments of economics and public policy. He has served as the chair of the National Bioethics Advisory Committee established during President Clinton’s administration.  He has dealt with issues of cloning and embryonic stem cell research—two of the most prominent ethical and moral questions raised by developments on the scientific frontier in recent years.

Find out what he has to say about ethical protocols, ethical issues as well as his view of public health and bioethics in the following Q&A. Continue reading Q&A with President Emeritus Harold Shapiro: Public health and policy–what does it involve?