Ebola: Why Quarantine?

A handful of states, in response to the Ebola outbreak, are imposing a mandatory quarantine on health care workers returning to the United States from Ebola zones amid fears of the virus spreading outside West Africa.[1]

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie and New Jersey officials now require that travelers coming through Newark Liberty International Airport be categorized as either high risk, some risk, or low risk. Continue reading

The Politicization of Disease

Senator and 2016 presidential hopeful Ted Cruz (R-TX) made media waves this October when he criticized the Obama Administration’s response to Ebola cases reported in the US. “I remain concerned we don’t see sufficient seriousness on the part of the federal government about protecting the American public and doing everything possible to ensure that people infected with Ebola do not come to the Unites States,” he said, advocating for an air travel ban for those coming to the United States from regions afflicted with the virus. “The administration is not treating [the outbreak] with the gravity it deserves.”

Cruz was just one of many Republicans – including Senator Rand Paul (R-KY) and Governor Rick Perry (R-TX) – denouncing the current administration’s ineffectiveness at the height of what was a highly competitive, highly partisan midterm campaign season. Continue reading

FDA Q&A: The Approval Process for Vaccines and Trumenba With Rachael Conklin: Communications Officer

Last month, the FDA approved Trumenba, a vaccine for meningitis B. Meanwhile, the vaccine that was administered to Princeton students last year, Bexsero, continues to be under review. Below, PPHR discusses the vaccine approval process with FDA Consumer Safety Officer Rachael Conklin.

PPHR: What considerations does the FDA have when approving a new vaccine?

Conklin: The main considerations are the same for approving a vaccine as for approving any other drug product: safety and efficacy. Continue reading

Public Ignorance and Ebola

Clipboard-Guy

In mid-October, a man – soon to be known as “Clipboard Guy” – was seen alongside four other health officers in hazmat suits, wheeling an Ebola patient for transfer from Dallas to Atlanta. He was wearing no protective gear, carrying a clipboard, and helping the HAZMAT-suited individuals with the patient. It caused an uproar on sites like Twitter, with people wondering why safety protocols seemed to be breached, why the virus was being taken lightly, and whether or not the man was infected and now a risk to society. As can be seen in this incident, mass hysteria is easily spurred by the media. As such, a lot of speculation about the Ebola virus has been based in ignorance and the human tendency to sensationalize.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, the head of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, was asked to explain the audacity of the man in a CNN interview. Continue reading

Valley Fever: The Mysterious Fungus Infecting the Southwest without a Vaccine or Cure

Valley Fever or Coccidioidomycosis, also known as cocci, is a fungal disease endemic to the soils of the Southwest. Around 60% of those exposed never have symptoms. The majority of the other 40% have flu-like symptoms. About 5 to 10% of those exposed develop serious and long-term problems with their lungs. In about 1% of those exposed, the fungus spreads throughout the entire body, infecting areas such as the brain and bones (1).

Although the first diagnosis was in 1892, Valley Fever continues to infect people without a vaccine or cure. Continue reading

The impact of restrictions on pain relief

Late last year, the Food and Drug Administration published an official online statement, proposing new restrictions that will make regulations on some of the most commonly prescribed pain medicines, such as Vicodin, stricter. According to the official statement, the “FDA has become increasingly concerned about the abuse and misuse of opioid products, which have sadly reached epidemic proportions in certain parts of the United States1.”

The classification of “epidemic” is not an exaggeration. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported that there were more than 36,000 deaths from drug overdoses in 2008, and most of these deaths were the result of prescription drug overdose2. Continue reading